Lillie Heyman

Lillie Heyman (she/her) is a 2021-2022 Eisendrath Legislative Assistant at the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism. She grew up in Florham Park, N.J., as a member of Congregation Beth Hatikvah.

2021 is Almost Over: Congress Must Act Before the New Year

Lillie Heyman
Israel Harris
December 17, 2021
We are in a time of great crisis, facing pandemics of systemic racism, poverty, climate change, voter suppression and COVID-19. Millions of Americans experience unemployment, hunger, and housing insecurity, facing the threat of climate change daily. People of Color and other marginalized communities experience the most adverse consequences. And the country continues to face endless attacks on our voting rights and reproductive rights. Before Congress breaks for their winter recess, there is much left to be done.

Reflecting on the Prayer Vigil: Congress Must Seize the Moment and Invest in Families

Lillie Heyman
October 27, 2021
After 12 hours of storytelling and prayer at the Washington Interfaith Staff Community's Build Back Better Prayer Vigil outside the U.S. Capitol on October 20, it was clear: bold investments in our economic recovery are crucial to the livelihood of workers, children, and families in the US. To rebuild the American economy and address the structural inequities that long preceded the pandemic, Congress must pass a robust Build Back Better Act.

Join us in Rallying to Defend Reproductive Rights on October 2nd

Lillie Heyman
September 24, 2021
The right to abortion is meaningless if it is not accessible. On September 2, 2021, the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to uphold Texas’s anti-abortion legislation, the most restrictive in the country. This new law is a novel strategy to restrict abortion access by banning abortions after six weeks and giving people the power to sue abortion providers. In fact, private citizens are incentivized to sue, as anyone who successfully sues an abortion provider, or anyone suspected of helping someone access an abortion, is entitled to at least $10,000 plus their legal fees. Anti-abortion politicians in other states are eager and ready to follow suit, with Florida legislators already drafting their own bill.