HOW DO I MAKE CHANGES TO MY TEEN’S REGISTRATION  – CONTACT INFORMATION, MEDICAL INFORMATION, ETC.  

At this time, all changes will need to be made by emailing Ltaken@rac.org 


MY CAMPMINDER ACCOUNT IS LOCKED, WHAT DO I DO? 

Please email us at Ltaken@rac.org and we can unlock it. 


I CANNOT REMEMBER THE ANSWER TO MY SECURITY QUESTIONS, WHAT DO I DO? 

Please email Ltaken@rac.org


I NEED AN EXCUSED ABSENCE LETTER FOR MY TEEN. WHERE CAN I FIND THIS? 

You can find an excused absence letter on the RAC website


I NEED A PACKING LIST FOR MY TEEN. WHERE CAN I FIND THIS? 

You can find a packing list on the RAC website


WHAT IS YOUR CANCELLATION POLICY? 

All cancellations, refunds, and payments will be handled by your congregation. Please contact your congregation to cancel your teen’s attendance to the L’Taken Social Justice Seminar.  


HOW MUCH MONEY SHOULD I HAVE MY STUDENTS BRING FOR OFFSITE MEALS? 

We recommend that students bring about $50 for offsite meals. This includes Saturday dinner, Sunday dinner, and Monday lunch. 


HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE FAMILIES OR CHAPERONES TO REGISTER? 

It should take about 15 minutes for families and chaperones to register for L’Taken. Each family will register their child in our CampMinder registration system. It should be noted that you cannot save your registration form and come back to it. It must be complete in one sitting. Please estimate an additional 5 minutes to upload your teen’s vaccine information into CampMinder. 


WILL FAMILIES PAY ON AN INDIVIDUAL BASIS? 

Families will not be given the option to pay when they register. All payments should be handled by your congregation. Please contact your congregation for questions about costs and payments..  

 
WHAT IS L’TAKEN

L’Taken is a transformational 4-day experience focused on Jewish values, tikkun olamtikkun olamתִּקּוּן עוֹלָם"Repair of the world;" Jewish concept that it is our responsibility to partner with God to improve the world. A mystical concept of restoration of God's holiest Name to itself and the repair of a shattered world. Often refers to social action and social justice.  and public policy. The program exposes high school students to a variety of public policy issues, guides them to explore the Jewish values surrounding these issues and teaches them the skills to be an effective social justice advocate. The weekend culminates with meeting on Capitol Hill. Your teens will have the opportunity to speak truth to power as they share their views on social justice topics with leaders on Capitol Hill. While exploring Washington, D.C., teens build and strengthen their congregational community and experience their own individual capacity to create change.  


WHERE DOES THE PROGRAM TAKE PLACE? 

The majority of L’Taken will take place at the hotel. In August, we will send out an email with your specific hotel details. We do not post hotel information on our website for security purposes. On Saturday and Sunday, we will visit various places around D.C, including the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Georgetown, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, and the Smithsonian museums. On Monday, we will be on Capitol Hill for lobbying. 


HOW DOES THE RAC CHOOSE WHICH POLICY ISSUES TO TEACH ABOUT AT L’TAKEN

Every L’Taken seminar addresses 10-12 different issue areas in a variety of interactive formats. These issues, ranging from Gun Violence Prevention to Criminal Justice Reform and Racial Justice, from LGBTQ+ Rights to environmental and economic justice, are selected based on both the current legislative agenda and issues of primary concern to the Reform Movement. The students are exposed to multiple perspectives on the issues, the Jewish values, texts and teachings that guide our thinking, and the positions adopted by the Reform Movement. 
  

WHAT DOES IT MEAN THAT THE RAC DOES NON-PARTISAN ADVOCACY WORK? 

Part of the great religious prophetic tradition is to explore what is broken in our world and, inspired by our faith, work to repair it. The First Amendment to the Constitution recognized the importance of the religious voice when it ensured that the government would not be allowed to stifle that voice. With that right comes the responsibility to engage in discussions about public policy in a non­ partisan way. 
 
Like every other religious denomination in America, the RAC's positions are based on the consensuses of decision-making processes of its national organization. The RAC does not speak for each of the members of Reform Jewish congregations and cherishes the rich diversity of views among those members. 
 
The RAC, like Reform synagogues and other religious organizations across the U.S., is a 501(c)3 tax­ exempt religious organization. This status allows us to engage in advocacy about the issues we care about as Jews and Americans. (For example, we advocate on issues ranging from supporting paid family and medical leave  to strong North American leadership in the Middle East peace process.) At the same time, our tax status forbids us from endorsing or opposing any political candidate or party. In shorthand: we engage on issues, not individuals or political parties. 
 
While the general stance of the positions taken by our national organizations are moderate-liberal, reflecting the trend of the broader Jewish community at the polls, the RAC has played a distinctive role in forging bi-partisan and interfaith coalitions during Congresses and Administrations controlled by both parties that have been effective in finding common ground. We take seriously the importance of being non-partisan and welcome opportunities to work with elected officials from across the political spectrum. 
  

HOW ARE THE POSITIONS OF THE REFORM MOVEMENT DECIDED? 

The Religious Action Center implements the policy positions adopted by the Union for Reform Judaism and the Central Conference of American Rabbis. Ultimately it is the members and rabbis of Reform congregations who set the policy for the Movement. During the Union for Reform Judaism's Biennial General Assembly, nearly 2,000 delegates from the majority of our nearly 850 member congregations consider, debate and vote on resolutions that reflect the consensus positions of our membership. Similarly, at the annual conference of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the rabbis vote directly on the policy positions of the CCAR. In our work, we never claim that these positions reflect the view of every Reform Jew; only that they are democratically-decided policies of the institution. The democratic process and the commitment of the Reform Movement to speak out on issues of concern is as old as the Movement itself, and is evidenced by the hundreds of resolutions adopted since its inception. It is these resolutions that give the RAC its mandate to act. All resolutions are posted on the URJ website.
 

HOW ARE DIVERSE OPINIONS EXPLORED AND ENCOURAGED THROUGHOUT THE CONFERENCE? 

RAC's positions are based on the consensuses of decision-making processes of its national organization. The RAC does not speak for each of the members of Reform Jewish congregations and cherishes the rich diversity of views among those members. 
 
During the opening, Friday night sermon at the L’Taken seminar, the Leadership Development Director emphasizes the importance of respecting and exploring diverse viewpoints, reminding students that while the Reform Movement has taken a particular stance on each of the issues that we explore, our tradition values debates and discussion around issues. He encourages students to picture a page of Talmud, where both the majority opinion and the minority opinion are preserved and respected. The value of considering multiple perspectives on a particular policy issue is reiterated in different ways throughout our programming. 
 

Should I send my student on this program if I don’t personally agree with all of the Reform Movement’s policy positions? 

Absolutely. The weekend is primarily about skills building. Over the course of the weekend, students learn the importance of civic responsibility and acquire valuable skills to help make their voices heard on issues of importance to them throughout their lives. We give students the tools to be effective advocates— instructing them how to best communicate the messages they wish to advance.  Perhaps most importantly, after experiencing a L’Taken weekend, students are empowered by the realization that they are capable of crafting a persuasive, passionate and convincing argument on an issue that they care about—whatever their views.  We hope and expect that students who have completed the L’Taken program will remain advocates, actively engaged in their communities throughout their lives.  
 

ARE L’TAKEN PARTICIPANTS REQUIRED TO ADVOCATE THE POSITIONS OF THE REFORM MOVEMENT? 

No student will ever be asked to advocate a position with which he or she disagrees. Each student speaks on only one topic during the group's visit to Capitol Hill. Since they are on Capitol Hill representing our Movement, we do ask that students select an issue with which they agree with the position of the Reform Movement. We work closely with individual students to explore the issues and answer their questions to ensure they are comfortable with and knowledgeable about the issue. Throughout the weekend, a broad range of issues are addressed -- including those affecting the U.S. (e.g. homelessness), the world (e.g. the crisis in Darfur), and Israel (e.g. the peace process). Students are almost always able to identify an issue that they are excited to speak about. 
 
During our lobby preparation process, we always offer to schedule visits for students in their home states with Members of Congress if they are unable to lobby on an issue that they are particularly passionate about. We strongly encourage all participants to take seriously the right and opportunity they have to make their voices heard, regardless of their views on the issues that we present. 
 
New groups and congregations join us each year. Let us help you make this a reality for your delegation! First time groups and groups that have not attended L’Taken in the past four years receive a L’Taken scholarship. We also have a variety of resources available to support groups in their first year of L’Taken